James Watt hakkında İngilizce metin

mustafa43

Hectopat
Katılım
26 Nisan 2014
Mesajlar
503
En iyi cevaplar
0
Beğeniler
82
James Watt was a Scottish inventor and mechanical engineer whose improvements to the Newcomen steam enginewere fundamental to the changes brought by the Industrial Revolutionin both his native Great Britain and the rest of the world.

While working as an instrument maker at the University of Glasgow, Watt became interested in the technology of steam engines. He realised that contemporary engine designs wasted a great deal of energy by repeatedly cooling and re-heating thecylinder. Watt introduced a design enhancement, the separate condenser, which avoided this waste of energy and radically improved the power, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of steam engines. Eventually he adapted his engine to produce rotary motion, greatly broadening its use beyond pumping water.

Watt attempted to commercialise his invention, but experienced great financial difficulties until he entered a partnership with Matthew Boulton in 1775. The new firm of Boulton and Watt was eventually highly successful and Watt became a wealthy man. In his retirement, Watt continued to develop new inventions though none were as significant as his steam engine work. He died in 1819 at the age of 83.

He developed the concept of horsepower and the SI unit of power, the watt, was named after him.
 
Son düzenleme:

KS
mustafa43

mustafa43

Hectopat
Katılım
26 Nisan 2014
Mesajlar
503
En iyi cevaplar
0
Beğeniler
82
Herhangi bir sıkıntı yok rahat ol.
Teşekkür ederim, müsaitseniz 1-2 metin daha yollayabilir miyim?

Gregor Johann Mendel

(July 20, 1822[1] – January 6, 1884)


Gregor Johann Mendel was a German-speaking Silesian scientist and Augustinian friar who gained posthumous fame as the founder of the modern science of genetics. Though farmers had known for centuries that crossbreeding of animals and plants could favor certain desirable traits, Mendel's pea plant experiments conducted between 1856 and 1863 established many of the rules of heredity, now referred to as the laws of Mendelian inheritance.

Mendel worked with seven characteristics of pea plants: plant height, pod shape and color, seed shape and color, and flower position and color. With seed color, he showed that when a yellow pea and a green pea were bred together their offspring plant was always yellow. However, in the next generation of plants, the green peas reappeared at a ratio of 1:3. To explain this phenomenon, Mendel coined the terms “recessive” and “dominant” in reference to certain traits. (In the preceding example, green peas are recessive and yellow peas are dominant.) He published his work in 1866, demonstrating the actions of invisible “factors”—now called genes—in providing for visible traits in predictable ways.

The profound significance of Mendel's work was not recognized until the turn of the 20th century (more than three decades later) with the independent rediscovery of these laws. Erich von Tschermak, Hugo de Vries, Carl Correns, and William Jasper Spillman independently verified several of Mendel's experimental findings, ushering in the modern age of genetics.
 



Yukarı